Key-readings

The key readings were selected and analyzed. They focus on (i) public engagement with science that range from an understanding of how people make decisions to how to develop trust in science and (ii) understanding the underrepresentation of women in science and the value of enacting gender-inclusive practices in public engagement with science. The authors, type, data released, organization, purpose and aim, summary, an overview of the points relevant to the project, and evaluation were analyzed for each of the key readings.

Key-reading 1: Public Engagement for Net-Zero: A literature review

Authors

Martin King, Chandrima Padmanabhan, and Katie Rose

Type 

Literature review

Data released

April 2021

Aim

An analysis of public engagement models on climate change that highlights how communication, collaboration and public engagement around climate interventions can be made more effective. This source covers the understanding of the factors causing distrust towards scientists and disengagement with science and climate action. Target audience: Both inexperienced and experienced professional science communicators can use this source as practical guidance.

Weblink

https://www.centreforpublicimpact.org/assets/documents/cpi-cgf-public-engagement-net-zero-lit-review.pdf

Key-reading 2: Media and scientific communication: a case of climate change

Authors

Maxwell T. Boykoff

Type 

Theoretical paper

Data released

January 2008

Aim

To demonstrate how science communication and the relationships of scientists, policy actors and the public affect the mass-media coverage of climate change.

Target audience: Scientists, professional science communicators, and others with interest in science communication in mass media with a focus on climate change.   Key-competences: This article will improve understanding of the factors causing distrust towards scientists and disengagement with science and climate action. It also aids in developing an understanding of how public engagement can benefit a scientist’s career.

Weblink

https://sp.lyellcollection.org/content/305/1/11

Key-reading 3: Shifting public engagement: How media coverage of climate change conferences affects climate change audience segments

Authors

Wonneberger, A., Meijers, M.H.C., & Schuck, A.R.T.

Type 

Research paper

Data released

February 2020

Aim

The aim is to research the climate change-related mobilization effects in the five identified segments of the Dutch population (Alarmed, Concerned, Cautious, Disengaged and Doubtful) in response to the media attention for the UN Climate Change Conference held in Paris in 2015 and the possible influences of this media attention on public opinion. 

 

Target audience: Scientists and professional science communicators. 

Key-competences: This article will improve understanding the factors causing distrust towards scientists and disengagement with science and climate action. It also explains the theory of motivated reasoning and provides insight into the level of audience engagement with climate change within the identified audience segments. 

Weblink

https://doi.org/10.1177/0963662519886474

Key-reading 4: People and power: Expanding the role and scale of public engagement in energy transitions

Authors

John H. Armstrong

Type 

Original research paper

Data released

11 June 2021

Aim

The paper explores the relation between science and technology studies (STS) and public engagement in issues related to energy and climate change. In particular, it assesses the limitations of primary STS perspectives and approaches to researching public engagement in energy transitions.

Target audience: Although the paper focuses primarily in the general public and people’s role in energy transitions (especially transformative one), it suggests recommendations for researchers to adopt new approaches and avenues for the incorporation of holistic analysis of public engagement.

Key-competences: this article improves readers’ understanding on how STS considers public role in leading and shaping energy transitions, for example addressing climate change globally.

Weblink

https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2214629621002292

Key-reading 5: What is Public Engagement and How Does it Help to Address Climate Change?

Authors

Ville Kumpu

Type 

Original research paper

Data released

05 April 2022

Aim

The paper aimed to review ways public engagement helps address climate change, by focusing on the concept of communication.

Target audience

The target audience are scientists, science communicators, psychologists, and sociologists interested in exploring the relation between public engagement and public communication with climate change.

Key-competences

The paper improves readers’ understanding in the way communication is approached as a tool to address climate change.

Weblink

https://doi.org/10.1080/17524032.2022.2055601 

Key-reading 6: Ten Thousand Voices on Marine Climate Change in Europe

Authors

Paul J. Buckley1, John K. Pinnegar1, 2, Suzanne J. Painting1, Geraldine Terry2, Jason Chilvers2, Irene Lorenzoni2, Stefan Gelcich3 and Carlos M. Duarte4 1

Type 

Original research paper

Data released

11 July 2017

Aim

The paper aimed to examine the established levels of awareness, concern, and trust among different demographic groups and nationalities, regarding scientific understanding and management of impacts of climate change in the marine environment.

Target audience: 10,000 European citizens from 10 countries.

Key competences: the article aims to increase readers’ knowledge concerning varying perceptions of marine climate change among different EU citizens.

Weblink

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2017.00206/full

Key-reading 7: Communicating Climate Change: Why Frames Matter for Public Engagement

Authors

Matthew C. Nisbet

Type 

Review

Data released

2009

Aim

The paper describes frames used for public engagement and historical development of these approaches. The paper helps to think about writing and oral skills needed to communicate science, mainly issues related to climate change. Moreover, it can improve understanding of the factors causing distrust towards scientists and disengagement with science and climate action.

Target audience: scientists, science communicators

Key competence: develop writing and oral skills needed to communicate science, mainly issues related to climate change; reflect critically on the social, historical, cultural and ethical dimensions of science.

Weblink

●      https://doi.org/10.3200/ENVT.51.2.12-23

Key-reading 8: Bridging the gap between science communication practice and theory: Reflecting on a decade of practitioner experience using polar outreach case studies to develop a new framework for public engagement design

Authors

Rhian A. Salmon, Heidi A. Roop

Type 

Research Article

Data released

2019

Aim

The paper proposes three foci for increasing the professionalization of practitioner approaches to Education, Outreach and Communication related to polar research. Target audience: scientists, science communicators.

Weblink

●      https://doi.org/10.1017/S0032247418000608

Key-reading 9: Humour and sarcasm: expressions of global warming on Twitter

Authors

Hande Eslen-Ziya

Type 

Research Article

Data released

2022

Aim

The paper presents interesting analysis of tweets related to the climate change. 

Target audience: scientists, science communicators

Key competence: develop writing and oral skills needed to communicate science, mainly issues related to climate change; reflect critically on the social, historical, cultural and ethical dimensions of science.

Weblink

●      https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-022-01236-y

Key-reading 10: Public engagement with climate change: what do we know, and where do we go from here?

Authors

Lorraine Whitmarsh, Saffron O’Neill, Irene Lorenzoni

Type 

Theoretical

Data released

March, 2013

Aim

The target audience of the paper are communicators lacking experience in science communication

Key competence: Develop writing and oral skills needed to communicate science, mainly issues related to climate change and the gender gap in STEM, in various spaces (popular science magazines, newspapers, websites, social media, TV, radio, TEDx talks, science festivals etc.)

Weblink

https://www.ingentaconnect.com/contentone/intellect/mcp/2013/00000009/00000001/art00002

Key-reading 11: Net zero public engagement and participation

Authors

Christina Demski

Type 

Report

Data released

March, 2021

Aim

The target audience of the paper are climate  policy makers

 

Key competence: Develop writing and oral skills needed to communicate science, mainly issues related to climate change and the gender gap in STEM, in various spaces (popular science magazines, newspapers, websites, social media, TV, radio, TEDx talks, science festivals etc.)

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/net-zero-public-engagement-and-participation

Key-reading 12: Is it climate change? Coverage by online news sites of the 2019 European summer heatwaves in France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK

Authors

James Painter, Joshua Ettinger, Marie‑Noëlle Doutreix, Nadine Strauß, Anke Wonneberger & Peter Walton

Type 

Research paper

Data released

November 2021

Aim

The target audience of the paper are science communicators on climate change. Key competence: Develop writing and oral skills needed to communicate science, mainly issues related to climate change and the gender gap in STEM, in various spaces (popular science magazines, newspapers, websites, social media, TV, radio, TEDx talks, science festivals etc.)

Weblink

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-021-03222-w

Key-reading 13: Public engagement with climate change: the role of human values

Authors

Adam Corner, Ezra Markowitz, Nick Pidgeon

Type 

Review

Data released

2014 (may/june)

Aim

Are there certain values on which public engagement with climate change is (or should be) predicated? The paper reviews the growing body of literature that explores the role of human values (and the closely related concept of cultural worldviews) in public engagement with climate change.

Target audience: scientists.

Key competences: Reflect critically on the social, historical, cultural and ethical dimensions of science.

Weblink

https://wires.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/17577799

Key-reading 14: Communication Practices and Political Engagement with Climate Change: A Research Agenda

Authors

Anabela Carvalho, Margit van Wessel & Pieter Maeseele

Type 

Review paper

Data released

October 2016

Weblink

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17524032.2016.1241815?journalCode=renc20

Key-reading 15: Quantifying stakeholder learning in climate change adaptation across multiple relational and participatory networks

Authors

Jose Daniel Teodoro, Christina Prell, Laixiang Sun

Type 

Empirical paper

Data released

October 2020

Weblink

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030147972031433X

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